Is Freud a Hard Determinist?

Prompt Question: Does Freud's theory, as you understand it, really imply that nofreewillism (AKA "hard determinism) is true.

Please read and follow these instructions. If you turn in a paper on Freud that does not follow these instructions, your paper will be worth zero points

("Hard determinism" is the name for the bizarre and self-contradictory theory that determinism is true and that, magically, this somehow means that free will doesn't exist. This is very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very different from plain old determinism, which ABSOLUTELY DOES NOT SAY ANYTHING ABOUT FREE WILL.)

Phase One

Read this brief description of Freud's theory: https://www.thoughtco.com/id-ego-and-superego-4582342.

Once you have a good handle on Freud's theory, and think about whether there is anything in that theory that implies the existence of a set of external forces that constrain or coerce everybody's actions so that no-one ever makes a decision that isn't forced on them by some outside pressure. If you think there is, in your own notes explain Freud's theory, including that part of the theory, and explain how that part implies the existence of that external force. If you don't see any way Freud's theory implies the existence of external coercive forces, in your own notes explain Freud's theory, and discuss how that theory is used to explain how human beings decide their own actions when they're not being coerced by other people. Make sure you have all this worked out before you go on to the next phase.

Phase Two

Read the following two articles, and then think for yourself about whether or not Freud's theory implies that we have no free will.

Simply Psychology

Gulf Bend Center

Now, decide for yourself whether Freud's theory, as you understand it, really implies that hard determinism is true. (Remember, "Hard determinism" is the name for the bizarre and self-contradictory theory that determinism is true and that, magically, this somehow means that free will doesn't exist. This is very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very, very different from plain old determinism, which ABSOLUTELY DOES NOT SAY ANYTHING ABOUT FREE WILL.)

(If you suffer from the misconception that determinism rules out free will, and find yourself wanting to say that determinism rules out free will, remember that DETERMINISM DOES NOT RULE OUT FREE WILL as you do this topic.)  (If your urge to claim that determinism rules out free will is so strong that you cannot set aside your feelings long enough to do this topic, you should either take the time to think about this common but utterly false view by attempting the topic incompatible.htm, or don't do this topic.)

It is important to remember that this is a philosophy assignment. You fulfill philosophy assignments by thinking about things for yourself. You do not fulfill them by reporting what other people think.


This Site is Proudly Hosted By:
WEBster Computing Services


Copyright 2004 by Martin C. Young
::: Made with CoffeeCup : Web Design Software & Website Hosting :::